Volume 3, Issue 1, June 2020, Page: 8-14
Determinants of Syphilis Infection among Women Seeking Antenatal Care and Delivery Services in Olenchity Primary Hospital: A Case-Control Study
Gindo Lema Gutema, Department of Public Health, Adama Hospital Medical College, Adama, Ethiopia
Sileshi Garoma Abeya, Department of Public Health, Adama Hospital Medical College, Adama, Ethiopia
Girma Ashenafi Ayele, Department of Family Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Received: Nov. 11, 2019;       Accepted: Jan. 8, 2020;       Published: Feb. 4, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijcd.20200301.13      View  466      Downloads  64
Abstract
The magnitude of syphilis infection among pregnant women is increasing worldwide. Syphilis infection during pregnancy is a risk of congenital syphilis for the fetus, might result in intrauterine death. The objective this study was to identify the predictors of syphilis infection among pregnant and delivering mother in Olenchity primary hospital from October 2017 to January 2018 G. C. Unmatched case-control study design (61 cases and 244 controls) was conducted among women seeking Antenatal care and delivery services. Cases and controls were selected based according to their of the serology result. Data was collected using pre-tested and structured questionnaire. The collected data were entered into EPI-info version 7 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Principally binary logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio at 95% confidence intervals. Education (AOR, 0.381; 95% CI: 0.169, 0.857), knowledge about Sexually transmitted Infections (AOR, 0.244 95% CI: 0.114, 0.522), loss of baby during pregnancy (AOR, 2.275; 95% CI: 1.022, 5.065), multiple sexual partner (AOR, 3.071; 95% CI: 1.220, 7.730), Cigarette smoking (AOR 7.628; 95% CI: 1.714,33.946), Human immune deficiency virus Positives (AOR, 41.145; 95% CI: 2.250, 752.362) were factors significantly associated with syphilis. Factors like having primary and secondary education and knowledgeable about sexually transmitted infections were less likely to have syphilis. However, having the history of multiple sexual partner, cigarette smoking, lose baby during pregnancy, HIV positive were more likely to associate with syphilis infection. These factors should be taken into consideration to prevent or curb the problems syphilis infection.
Keywords
Syphilis Infection, Hospital, Olenchity
To cite this article
Gindo Lema Gutema, Sileshi Garoma Abeya, Girma Ashenafi Ayele, Determinants of Syphilis Infection among Women Seeking Antenatal Care and Delivery Services in Olenchity Primary Hospital: A Case-Control Study, International Journal of Clinical Dermatology. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2020, pp. 8-14. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcd.20200301.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Eval CS_Management_pregnant women, (Internet).2010. Available at: www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/CDPH Document.
[2]
Nathaniel SKE. Prevalence and Associated Factors for Syphilis in Pregnant Women Attending Selected Antenatal Clinics in Juba, Southern Sudan. 2010 [cited 2017 Sep 13].
[3]
World Health Organization. WHO guidelines for the treatment of treponema pallidum (Syphilis). [Internet]. 2016. Available at: https://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/rtis/syphilis-treatment-guidelines/en/.
[4]
Changing-the-Story-of-Syphilis-Success-Story, CDC /National center for HIV/AIDS, Viral hepatitis, STD and TB prevention. 508c. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/products/success/changing-the-story-of-syphilis-success-story-508c.pdf.
[5]
Eliminating mother to child transmission of syphilis, a health start to life in Zambia, www.path.org. [Cited 2017 Sep 13].
[6]
Wilkinson D, Sach M, Connolly C. Epidemiology of syphilis in pregnancy in rural South Africa: opportunities for control. Trop Med Int Health. 1997; 2 (1): 57–62. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1365-3156.1997.d01-127.x/ful.
[7]
CDC /National center for HIV/AIDS, Viral hepatitis, STD and TB prevention, Syphilis-April- 2019. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/default.htm.
[8]
Abenezer Chegen. Assessment of magnitude of HIV and Syphilis and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care in wolemera district, June 2017.
[9]
Zhou H, Chen X-S, Hong F-C, Pan P, Yang F, Cai Y-M, Yin YP, Peeling RW, Mabey D. Risk factors for syphilis infection among pregnant women: results of a case-control study in Shenzhen, China. Sex Transm Infect 2007; 83 (6): 476–80. Available at: https://sti.bmj.com/content/83/6/476.full.
[10]
Todd J. Risk factors for active syphilis and TPHA seroconversion in a rural African population. Sex Transm Infect. 2001; 77 (1): 37-45.
[11]
Slutsker JS, Hennessy RR, Schillinger JA. Factors Contributing to Congenital Syphilis Cases -New York City, 2010–2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018; 67: 1088–1093. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6739a3External.
[12]
Genç M, Ledger WJ Syphilis in pregnancy Sexually Transmitted Infections 2000; 76: 73-79.
[13]
Nagi AM, Allah HAW, Khalid OM, others. Seroprevalence of syphilis among pregnant women in the Tri-capital, Khartoum, Sudan. Res J Med Sc. 2008; 3: 48–52.
[14]
Annual Reprort of East Shoa Zone Health Office, 1017.
[15]
Macêdo VC de, Lira PIC de, Frias PG de, Romaguera LMD, Caires SDFF, Ximenes RA de A. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study. Rev Saude Publica. 2017; 51: 78.
[16]
Temmerman M. Effect of a syphilis control programme on pregnancy outcome in Nairobi, Kenya. Sex Transm. 2000; 76 (2): 117–21.
[17]
Endris M, Deressa T, Belyhun Y, Moges F. Seroprevalence of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus infections among pregnant women who attend the University of Gondar teaching hospital, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross sectional study. BMC Infect Dis. 2015; 15 (1).
[18]
Manyahi J, Jullu BS, Abuya MI, Juma J, Ndayongeje J, Kilama B, Sambu V, Nondi J, Rabiel B, Somi G, Matee MI. Prevalence of HIV and syphilis infections among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Tanzania. BMC Public Health 2015; 15: 501.
Browse journals by subject